Malnutrition

Malnutrition

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The key findings of the report entitled Diet and Nutritional Status of Urban Population in India and Prevalence of Obesity, Hypertension, Diabetes and Hyperlipidemia in Urban Men and Women, National Nutrition Monitoring Bureau (NNMB) Technical Report no. 27, National Institute of Nutrition (NIN), (please click here to access), are as follows:

• The overall prevalence of underweight, stunting and wasting among urban children below 5 years during 2015-16 was 25.1 percent, 28.7 percent and 16.0 percent, respectively.

• The prevalence of underweight in urban children below 5 years age was highest in Uttar Pradesh (43.6 percent), followed by Madhya Pradesh (32.3 percent), Maharashtra (31.0 percent), West Bengal (25.4 percent) and Bihar (25.2 percent).

• The prevalence of stunting in urban children below 5 years age was highest in Uttar Pradesh (40.8 percent), followed by Maharashtra (36.4 percent), New Delhi (35.7 percent), West Bengal (34.4 percent) and Madhya Pradesh (34.1 percent). 

• The prevalence of underweight among ST, SC, OBC and others urban male children below 5 years age was 32.4 percent, 32.6 percent, 25.8 percent and 21.0 percent, respectively.

• The prevalence of stunting among ST, SC, OBC and others urban male children below 5 years age was 34.4 percent, 39.4 percent, 27.8 percent and 26.8 percent, respectively.

• The prevalence of wasting among ST, SC, OBC and others urban male children below 5 years age was 17.4 percent, 18.0 percent, 16.9 percent and 13.7 percent, respectively.

• The prevalence of underweight among ST, SC, OBC and others urban female children below 5 years age was 25.2 percent, 31.7 percent, 25.8 percent and 20.1 percent, respectively.

• The prevalence of stunting among ST, SC, OBC and others urban female children below 5 years age was 33.1 percent, 33.4 percent, 26.4 percent and 25.6 percent, respectively.

• The prevalence of wasting among ST, SC, OBC and others urban female children below 5 years age was 13.6 percent, 17.5 percent, 16.6 percent and 12.6 percent, respectively.

• In urban areas the proportion of underweight, stunting and wasting is highest among those boys (below 5 years) who belong to households without any access to sanitary latrines i.e. 43.0 percent, 50.2 percent and 22.0 percent, respectively. The proportion of under-nutrition (for all 3 categories i.e. underweight, stunting and wasting) is lowest among those boys (below 5 years) who belong to households having and using sanitary latrines.

• In urban areas, the proportion of underweight, stunting and wasting is highest among those girls (below 5 years) who belong to households without any access to sanitary latrines i.e. 40.5 percent, 44.6 percent and 19.7 percent, respectively. The proportion of under-nutrition (for all 3 categories i.e. underweight, stunting and wasting) is lowest among those girls (below 5 years) who belong to households having and using sanitary latrines.

• Almost 82.0 percent of surveyed households in urban areas possess sanitary latrines. The proportion of urban households having sanitary latrines was highest in Kerala (99.0 percent), followed by Rajasthan (95.6 percent), Gujarat (90.7 percent) and Puducherry (90.3 percent). The proportion of urban households having sanitary latrines was lowest in West Bengal (51.6 percent), followed by Uttar Pradesh (69.8 percent), New Delhi (70.4 percent) and Maharashtra (75.2 percent).

• The average household consumption of cereals and millets in urban areas was 69.6 percent of the Recommended Daily Intake (RDI). Similarly, the average household consumption of green leafy vegetables in urban areas was 59.5 percent of the RDI.        

• In urban areas, the average household consumption of protein, energy, calcium, iron, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, and niacin was 89.8 percent, 83.2 percent, 67.0 percent, 77.6 percent, 22.8 percent, 83.3 percent, 50.0 percent, and 61.3 percent of the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA), respectively. 

 


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